Naqqara

More informations

Description

The instrument is a type of drum with a membrane made of skin on the superior part. The shell is made of copper and is concave shaped. Along the shell the membrane is braided forming a sort of net that stretches on the instrument’s upper part. Generally used in pairs, each drum is tuned in a different pitch. To play the musician beats the sticks on the rums. The museums specimen does not have sticks.

To learn more

Small Arab drum, antecessor of modern timpani. Used in pairs, tuned in different pitches, generally struck with leather or wooden headed sticks. The rim is concave, and can be made of leather, copper, wood or clay. It was probably through the Crusades that this instrument has entered Europe, being used in military music. There are many evidences of its use in this musical modality in records dated from the 10th Century to the 16th Century, in Europe. Around the 8th Century they became the symbol of aristocracy in that continent, along with the antecessors of the trumpets (longer instruments, known as buzine). They reached, at the time, an important position and prestige amongst feudal authorities. Many kings of Europe possessed nakers in their regiments, using them for entertainment purposes, with the intention of increasing the emotive charge of their tournaments and battles. In the South of Asia, they were used (generally in pairs) also for military functions. They are known, still, as tribal and folkloric instruments, especially for dance.
Text written by percussion professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) Pedro Sá

General data (classification and additional names)

211.12 Sets of vessel drums

Naggarah (Source: CARVALHO, 1905)

Specimen’s data (this item specifically)

mvim_dc_me_0088

sec. XIX d.C.

,

Small naqqara: D=18,5cm H=12cm Big naqqara: D=21cm A=14cm

Later inscription: label on the membrane of the small naqqara "Ns. 32 [?]". Later inscription: marks indicate that there was a label on the membrane of the big naqqara.

Donated by João Baptista da Motta and Rodolfo Bernadelli

Small naqqara:MIDC/EM/UFRJ 211.1 I3 Prat.3
Big naqqara: MIDC/EM/UFR 211.1 I2 Prat.3

Bibliography

ALMEIDA, 1994.
BASE MINERVA, 2014.
BETHENCOURT; BORDAS; CANO; CARVAJAL; SOUZA; DIAS; LUENGO; PALACIUS; PIQUER, ROCHA, RODRIGUEZ; RUBIALES; RUIZ, 2012.
BRAGA, 1973.
BRANDÂO, 2013.
CARVALHO, 1905.
MIMO, 2014.
ROLLA, 1974.
PEDRO SÁ, 2014.
SOARES, 1990.

Notes

Probably the label of the big naqqara which is now illegible refers to the number and the name of the instrument as it was on the 1905 catalogue.